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2001 Milwaukee Irish Fest

Cultural presentations at the 2001 Milwaukee Irish Fest were based around the theme "From Ogham to IT" and included displays about Illuminated Manuscripts, The Stories on the High Crosses, Peat Postcards, and Bog Oak. Other displays included the Railways of Ireland, Journey of St. Brendan, and an exhibit on George M. Cohan. Walton’s Music relaunched its Glenside Label. The McAteer clan celebrated their reunion.

Entertainers included Barachois, Dara, Eileen Ivers Band, Sliabh Notes, Beginnish, Schooner Fare, Natalie MacMaster, Gaelic Storm, Danu, Derek McCormack, Luka Bloom, Fenians, Omagh Community Youth Choir, Tommy Makem, and Different Drums of Ireland. Dancers included the Glencastle Irish Dancers, Trinity Irish Dancers, Cashel-Dennehy Irish Dancers, Caledonian Irish Dancers, and Gillan School of Highland Dance.

2001 Fun Facts

  • Days: August 16, 17, 18, 19
  • Attendance: 130,057
  • Tickets: $10 for adults, $7 seniors; kids 12 and under free; Grand Gathering is $5; free admission from 4-5pm on Friday
  • Theme: The Best Thing About Summer
  • Omagh Unity Choir and Milwaukee Irish Fest Choir
  • George M. Cohan tribute
  • World premier of Margaret Rogers' Maeve's Party.
  • Waltons Music relaunches Glenside Music label
  • Galway vs. Milwaukee hurlers game

2001 Entertainment Highlights

  • Barachois
  • Beginnish
  • Danu
  • Dara
  • Derek McCormack
  • Different Drums of Ireland
  • Eileen Ivers Band
  • Fenians
  • Gaelic Storm
  • Luka Bloom
  • Natalie MacMaster
  • Omagh Community Youth Choir
  • Schooner Fare
  • Sliabh Notes
  • Tommy Makem

2001 Milwaukee Irish Fest Media

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